This week in Islam: 8 yr old bride dies on wedding night, if from sex

evil wasabi

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http://www.albawaba.com/editorchoice/yemen-child-marriage-human-rights-519066

This was supposedly okay since the prophet Mohammad, pbuh, married Ayesha when she was 6, or maybe 9, not sure, but apologists insist he didn't consummate until she was 13.
Al Nahar, Lebanon, has reported that an eight year old child bride died in Yemen on her wedding night after suffering internal injuries due to sexual trauma. Human rights organizations are calling for the arrest of her husband who was five times her age.

The death occurred in the tribal area of Hardh in northwestern Yemen, which borders Saudi Arabia. This brings even more attention to the already existing issue of forced child marriages in the Middle Eastern region.

"According to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), between 2011 and 2020, more than 140 million girls will become child brides. Furthermore, of the 140 million girls who will marry before the age of 18, 50 million will be under the age of 15."

It is reported that over a quarter of Yemen's young girls are married before the age of 15. Not only do they lose access to health and education, these child brides are commonly subjected to physical, emotional and sexual violence in their forced marriage.

One of the main issues is that there is currently no consistent established definition of a "child" that has been agreed upon worldwide. This leaves various interpretations within countries and little protection for those who are affected.

Establishing this age limit is among the top priorities of groups like HRC which was responsible for publishing the 54-page report “How Come You Allow Little Girls to Get Married?”, documenting the lifelong damage to girls who are forced to marry young. Most pro age-limit organizations agree that 18 should be the legal age for marriage.

In February 2009, a law was created in Yemen that set the minimum age for marriage at 17. Unfortunately, it was repealed after more conservative lawmakers called it un-Islamic.
 

Jon

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While terrible, why do I doubt this statistic?

"According to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), between 2011 and 2020, more than 140 million girls will become child brides."

Sounds slightly unrealistic. Of course, this is coming from the UN.

Jon
 

bokmeow

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Latest news update says this story is false.
Not saying that child brides aren't a problem though, and I know a lot of friends who have worked for NGOs that campaign against exploitation of women and underaged girls. You hear about a lot of moneyed people from the gulf, rich from oil wealth, spending their fortunes in other countries.
Sex tourism is everywhere around the world.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/09/10/yemen-8-year-old-girl-death_n_3899712.html?utm_hp_ref=world

Yemen Officials Deny 8-Year-Old Girl Died From Sex With 40-Year-Old Husband: Report

The Huffington Post | By Hunter Stuart Posted: 09/10/2013 12:19 pm EDT | Updated: 09/10/2013 12:19 pm EDT

Yemeni officials and journalists are saying the reports that an 8-year-old girl allegedly died of vaginal tearing on her wedding night are false, according to a report in Dubai-based news site Gulf News.

“When I heard the rumors [of the girl's death], I called the girl’s father," the local director of Criminal Investigation, Mosleh Al Azzani, told Gulf News by telephone on Monday. "He came with his daughter and denied the marriage and death of his daughter. I have the photos of the girl and will show it to anyone.”

Gulf News also quotes a local journalist and a children's rights activist in Yemen's capital who say they've investigated the story and believe it's false. "Some people create these stories to get publicity and attention and aid from international organizations," said activist Ahmad Al Qurishi of the SEYAJ Organization for Childhood Protection, a nonprofit volunteer organization.

Reports that the 8-year-old girl had died of internal wounds on her wedding night went viral online after Kuwaiti news site Al Watan published the story on Sunday, citing local Yemeni newspaper Al Mashhad. The Al Watan report said the girl, Rawan, died of "vaginal tearing" after being married to a 40-year-old man in the northwestern Yemeni town of Haradh, according to a Huffington Post translation of the Al Watan report.

The story quickly gained international attention, getting picked up by major news sites from Australia, London and the United States, where Fox News and Glenn Beck's The Blaze both featured it on Monday.

In the spring of 2010, UNICEF and a local human rights group reported that a 13-year-old Yemeni girl died of internal injuries just three days after having intercourse with her husband, who was twice her age.

The United Nations estimates that one in three girls in Yemen are married before they turn 18, often to older men who offer the girls' families financial relief from the strain of taking care of their children.

Mohamed Omar contributed to this report.
 

ki_atsushi

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While terrible, why do I doubt this statistic?

"According to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), between 2011 and 2020, more than 140 million girls will become child brides."

Sounds slightly unrealistic. Of course, this is coming from the UN.

Jon

That statistic sounds like it's taken out of context. That number probably covers the whole world, not just Islamic countries. In which case it sounds feasible. 3rd world country people breed like rabbits.
 

ki_atsushi

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Latest news update says this story is false.
Not saying that child brides aren't a problem though, and I know a lot of friends who have worked for NGOs that campaign against exploitation of women and underaged girls. You hear about a lot of moneyed people from the gulf, rich from oil wealth, spending their fortunes in other countries.
Sex tourism is everywhere around the world.

I call bullshit, why would they concoct a story around about someone dying if they are still alive and it can be proven?

Let me guess, the photos this guy produces are before the death?

P.S.- Why did they pick this guy out of nowhere if it's a fake story? (that's what I'm getting at)
 
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SML

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I also feel like this is a false story, if only because I believe I have read it before a few years ago, and a few years before that, etc. The kind of story that's designed to end up in "This week in Islam" threads, like the "mass child wedding" stories you may have seen.

That aside, yes, child weddings are a practice inexcusable by appeals to cultural relativism.
 

bokmeow

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I call bullshit, why would they concoct a story around about someone dying if they are still alive and it can be proven?

Let me guess, the photos this guy produces are before the death?

P.S.- Why did they pick this guy out of nowhere if it's a fake story? (that's what I'm getting at)

Well, not the first time a story was concocted about still living individuals. Sells papers maybe?

Anyways, the journalist insists that it's true, but government officials, and an independent children's rights organization in Yemen says the story is false. The journalist has to protect his reputation, 'cos the veracity of his reporting is his business card, Yemen doesn't want more unrest from poverty and revolt inspired by the Arab Spring. The children's rights organization would be the only party to gain support from highlighting this issue; yet, not only did it conclude from its investigations that the story is false, it accused the reporter of being party to groupings of people that create such stories in order to get publicity, attention, and aid from international organizations.

So, stay tuned.
 

StevenK

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While terrible, why do I doubt this statistic?

"According to the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), between 2011 and 2020, more than 140 million girls will become child brides."

Sounds slightly unrealistic. Of course, this is coming from the UN.

Jon

They're counting anyone under the age of 18 as a child. The legal age to marry in most of Europe, and a lot of the world in fact, is 16, so it becomes a meaningless statistic.

The 50 million under 15 is an eye opener though as there are very few countries where this is legal.
 

evil wasabi

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I also feel like this is a false story, if only because I believe I have read it before a few years ago, and a few years before that, etc. The kind of story that's designed to end up in "This week in Islam" threads, like the "mass child wedding" stories you may have seen.

That aside, yes, child weddings are a practice inexcusable by appeals to cultural relativism.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-middle-east-23454291

In a three-minute video posted online, Nada al-Ahdal, a slight and pretty 11-year-old girl, has caught the attention of millions in her home country, Yemen, and abroad, as she tells her story.

Sitting in a car, she speaks to the camera eloquently and forcefully, and tells of an alleged attempt by her parents to forcibly marry her to an older man.

"Does it satisfy you for me to be married? Does this satisfy you?... Mum, accept this: I don't want you. You killed my dreams, all of them."

The video went viral, first in Arabic, and then in a version that was translated into English, and clocked over seven million views in three days.

However, since it first emerged, a number of sides, including Nada's parents, have disputed the child's story.

The case has thrown a spotlight on the contentious issue of the forced marriage of children in Yemen, where it is a socially accepted custom in some areas.

Some Yemeni social media users reacted negatively to the video itself, feeling that it was wrong to expose Nada's parents to public criticism, as it was not in keeping with Yemeni traditions.

"I swear this is shameful. How can you bash the girls of Yemen like this… You've embarrassed us… This is the start of her going astray," was the reaction of one Yemeni Facebook user.

Nada is now in the custody of the Yemeni Women's Union, a women's rights NGO.


Nada al-Ahdal says she ran away from home to avoid marriage
Ramzia al-Eryani, the head of the organisation, maintains that Nada's story is genuine, and not uncommon.

"This is not the first time this has happened, there have been far worse cases. Only last week we had two cases that were much worse," she said.

Prevalent
The issue of child marriage in Yemen began to hit the international headlines with the case of Nujood Ali, who was nine years old when, in 2008, she escaped her two-month marriage and went to court seeking a divorce.

She was granted one, and went on to win international awards, as well as publishing a book, I am Nujood, Age 10 and Divorced.

In 2009, there were attempts by Yemeni parliamentarians and civil society groups to get a law passed restricting marriage to those who are 18 years and over.

However, this failed after opposition from hardline conservative MPs, and a fatwa from Abdulmajeed al-Zindani, a prominent cleric.

Continue reading the main story

Start Quote

Nada is saying she has a choice - she doesn't want to be with her mother under these circumstances”

Abdulsalam al-Ahdal
Nada's uncle
The official marriage age remains 15, a law set in 1994, although the law is vague and not widely implemented.

Despite the national and international attention, child marriage remains prevalent in Yemen.

The International Center for Research on Women records in a study that 48.9% of Yemeni females were married before the age of 18.

According to the Gender Development Research and Studies Centre at Sanaa University, up to 65% of marriages between 2010 and 2012 involved children, rising to 70% in rural areas.

Alaa al-Eryani, a feminist blogger, who was one of the first to write on Nada's case, says there is a discrepancy between people living in rural and urban areas in their reaction to Nada's case, and child marriage in general.

"If you go to a small village, they would tell you that she's crazy for running away from her parents, if you go to these villages, eight-year-olds are being married… Here in the city, where people are generally more educated and aware, they would tell you that it shouldn't happen."

Ms al-Eryani remains optimistic that Nada's case will cause some change.

"I hope it was a wake-up call for some people," she says.

'Strong and brave'
Meanwhile, Nada's uncle, Abdulsalam al-Ahdal, who took her in, says the majority of the family, and wider society, have given him and Nada their support.

He says any negative reactions to Nada are the result of what he describes as a misuse of religion to justify child marriage.

"There wasn't a problem. The whole family knows she is strong and brave, and that this is a decision that she has taken for her future."

He also says that Nada is adamant that she will not return to her parents.

"Nada is saying that she has a choice - she doesn't want to be with her mother under these circumstances. If they force her, she will run away again, or she says she will commit suicide."

Nonetheless, Nada, clearly not fazed by the events of the past few weeks, appears to be regaining the dreams she once had.

"I want to be a singer," she exclaims excitedly, as her uncle watches on, "I want to be a star!"

Different victim, same government trying to cover it up.
 

evil wasabi

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Well, not the first time a story was concocted about still living individuals. Sells papers maybe?

Anyways, the journalist insists that it's true, but government officials, and an independent children's rights organization in Yemen says the story is false. The journalist has to protect his reputation, 'cos the veracity of his reporting is his business card, Yemen doesn't want more unrest from poverty and revolt inspired by the Arab Spring. The children's rights organization would be the only party to gain support from highlighting this issue; yet, not only did it conclude from its investigations that the story is false, it accused the reporter of being party to groupings of people that create such stories in order to get publicity, attention, and aid from international organizations.

So, stay tuned.

Seems a lot of news sources have picked up on this story and are running with it. But Good on you for protecting the Yemeni government from scrutiny.
 

Poonman

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Pretty much any judeo-christian religion needs to be wiped off the map. A spinoff like Islam is a good place as any to start.

After that, someone needs to systematically start converting Koreans back to Buddhism...yeah, it was good for a laugh at first, but now it's starting to get pretty fucked up.


Time to clean house.
 

hyper

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Latest news update says this story is false.
Not saying that child brides aren't a problem though, and I know a lot of friends who have worked for NGOs that campaign against exploitation of women and underaged girls. You hear about a lot of moneyed people from the gulf, rich from oil wealth, spending their fortunes in other countries.
Sex tourism is everywhere around the world.
yea....................

..............
 

Fuzzytaco

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Even the moderate ones poorly represent the "religion of peace".
 
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